CEO of Whiteblock Makes Governance of Blockchain More Provocative, Comical, Butt Play Along

The act of governing blockchain technology is incredibly difficult, considering the slew of opinions from the rest of the community. Bringing in upgrades that open-source projects, which Ethereum and Bitcoin have been a part of, is hotly debated.

However, in the effort to keep the peace in a very provocative way, The Next Web just reported an extension that consumers can download to their Chrome browser – “Gspot.”

The Gspot extension, created by CEO Zak Cole of Whiteblock, was inspired by the way that Ethereum recently introduced a possible change to the distribution model, which would provide devs with mining rewards.

With the plugin, any occurrence of the word “governance” will be changed to “assplay.” However, before it does, the user has it “hit it,” meaning the Gspot button.

Cole, speaking with The Next Web, said that the arguments between individuals in the community is “getting out of hand,” especially considering that everything just comes down to “funding and money.” The primary of sources of funding, says Cole, are ConsenSys and the Ethereum foundation.

He added that this governance creates a major issue in the community. However, the problem is that the term “governance” is usually a “blanket term,” covering discussions that are actually about funding issues instead.

A perfect example of this problem happened last year, when Vitalik Buterin of Ethereum had set out on a mission to managed cryptocurrencies that were “lost.” However, CoinDesk reported on the major issues in the community at even the mention of this type of control.

Clearly, Ethereum’s relationship with governance has continued to have the same problems this year. Cole believes that the continued drama around governance makes it hard to work with the future Web 3.0, taking away attention from the coding, architecture, and more. He added that:

“Governance is not broken. I do not think it’s as big a deal as it’s being portrayed as. We’re still trying to navigate this space that’s still being designed. So long as we’re collaborative in addressing these issues and figuring it out together, I’d chalk the rest up to growing pains.”

Anyone with a good sense of humor will be happy to find that the extension can be activated on the entire internet, rather than just Twitter.

Cole explained that this widespread use is “why it took a week to get approval from Google’s webstore,” adding that Google had absolutely no problem with the word “assplay.” Instead, the only concern was how the extension would impact all browser sessions, instead of a specific page or tab. According to The Next Week, the logo was not even a problem.

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